Tag Archives: dbm

Tom Carpenter’s WiFiStat Tool

UPDATE: WIFISTAT has been modified so that you can run:

wifistat 0

For unlimited iterations. The three options now are:

  • wifistat
    • this will run 1 iteration
  • wifistat 0
    • this will run until you press CTRL+C
  • wifistat #
    • this will run for the number of iterations specified as #

Additionally, a timestamp is provided.

Here is a tool by request. WIFISTAT.EXE will show the Tx/Rx rate and signal strength for the current connection (WLAN) in dBm. By default, it lists the information and exits, like so:

WiFiStat.exe with No Parameters
WiFiStat.exe with No Parameters

Here is the tool with the parameter 5 (of course, if you move while running, the signal will change:

WifiStat.exe with a Parameter of 5
WifiStat.exe with a Parameter of 5

Here is the download, have fun. Like all my tools, it comes with no support and no error processing as they are created as learning experiments or for my own use [smile].

WiFiStat.zip Download

 

Tom Carpenter’s WiFiScan Tool

NOTE: Tool has been updated to resolve problems on some systems. (Feb. 13, 2017)

OK. I have a problem with NETSH. It shows signal levels in percentages based on a known algorithm, but gives no option to show dBm levels. Hence, WiFiScan.exe. This little tool will pull the NETSH information in, convert signal strength to show dBm as well (for strengths weaker than -50 and stronger than -100) and show them parenthetically after the percentage info. The command is the same as:

NETSH WLAN SHOW NETWORKS MODE=BSSID

It goes against the default WLAN interface and has no parameters. I may modify it to allow for interface specification, but it serves my purpose for now. By the way, the conversion to dBm follows this logic:

if(quality <= 0)
    dBm = -100
else if(quality >= 100)
    dBm = -50 or better
else
    dBm = (quality / 2) - 100

The wifiscan.exe tool should be run while not connected to a WLAN. It will sort of work if you’re connected, but give you an error related to an array. I may fix that when energy returns. Here’s the tool, feel free to download and use at your own risk [smile]:

Download the Feb. 13, 2017 WiFiScan tool.